The Philadelphia City Hall in Pennsylvania

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The Philadelphia City Hall

Philadelphia City Hall, built in 1901 and located at 1 Penn Square, it is the seat of government for the city of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

This building was designed by Scottish-born architect John McArthur, Jr., in the Second Empire style, and was constructed from 1871 until 1901 at a cost of $24 million. City Hall was topped off in 1894, although the interior wasn’t finished until 1901. Designed to be the world’s tallest building, it was surpassed during construction by the Washington Monument and the Eiffel Tower, though it was at completion the world’s tallest habitable building. It was the first modern building (excluding the Eiffel Tower) to be the world’s tallest and also was the first secular habitable building to have this record: all previous world’s tallest buildings were religious structures, including European cathedrals and, for the previous 3,800 years, the Great Pyramid of Giza.

With almost 700 rooms, City Hall is the largest municipal building in the United States. The building houses three branches of government, playing host to the city’s executive branch (the Mayor’s Office), its legislature (the Philadelphia City Council), and a substantial portion of the judicial activity in the city (with the Civil Division and Orphan’s Court of the Pennsylvania Court of Common Pleas for the First Judicial District being housed there, as well as chambers for some criminal judges and some judges of the Philadelphia Municipal Court).

 

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Sources:

Warren Picture Place (My Photography Business)

Wikipedia

Travel via Train Across the USA?!

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Traveling coast-to-coast across the United States by train is one of the world’s greatest travel experiences. Amazingly, it’s also one of the world’s greatest travel bargains — the 3,400-mile trip can cost as little as $213.

The American railroads are reminiscent of a bygone era. These were the trains that tamed the Wild West, fueled the Gold Rush, and served as the backbone of the Industrial Revolution. At its peak, it was the most luxurious mode of transportation that money could buy. Alas, the golden age of American railroads came to an end. Automobiles arrived and the airplane industry took off. Soon, many railroad companies had to cut losses and ceased their passenger services.

Today, the USA still has an excellent rail network for visitors that’ll take you to almost all the towns and cities a visitor would want to see. Arguably, the most scenic and historic of all the train routes in America is the cross-country journey from San Francisco to New York. As you climb through the snow-capped Sierra Nevadas, and further east through the heart of the Rockies, you may find it hard to disagree.

 

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